Decisions, Decisions

I took a year off Facebook (mostly). In that time I finished four manuscripts and even managed to take 2nd place in a Writers Digest contest.

I went back to Facebook.

I lost my verve to write.

Coincidence?

I had hoped the political vitriol would settle down after the election, but it has worsened. The hate, the bullying, and unwillingness to see beyond fear of the future staggers me every time I log on. No wonder I lost my will to write. I can’t write when I’m too stunned to think straight.

So off again I go. Mostly. I’ll still participate in my chosen groups and maybe toss in a picture or two. But as for spending hours (or even minutes) scrolling through people’s feeds, not going to happen. It makes me sad, because I’ll be missing out on some good stuff, too. In the end, though, real life matters more than the constant and oftentimes discordant noise of social media.

On the other hand:

I read how Andrea Bocelli backed out of singing at the inauguration due to death threats:
Other entertainers have backed out for similar reasons.

On another website I posted this:

“I’m not furious over the death threats. Angry, yes, but not furious, because it’s expected.

What’s really infuriating is how many people capitulate to the threats. We are supposed to be the ones who believe in freedom, liberty, etc., and that requires strength of will. If we want the bullying to stop, we have to stand up to it.”

Someone else responded thusly: “When good men/women do NOT cave, you get the birth of the greatest nation on earth after telling George III to piss off, you also get to be the victors of WWII after forcing Hitler to eat a bullet…..men who cave in to fear, deserve to live in fear….men who stand up for freedom WILL live free”

By kicking myself off Facebook, I’m in effect running away. I’m allowing myself to be bullied, and giving in to my own fears. If people are allowed to spread hate and to bully with no response, they win. It also give them license to keep doing it to others.

I don’t care who someone voted for. That they hate our current President-Elect, or hated President Obama, I can’t change, nor would I attempt to. But I have to draw the line when someone attacks someone else for political differences, or deciding to entertain at a particular national event.

On another person’s post someone said (basically) that since people hated on Obama and his supporters, it’s okay to hate on Trump and his supporters. I responded with, “Just because some people have said horrible things about Obama and his family, it doesn’t mean it’s okay for others to do the same to Trump. Bad behavior is still bad behavior, regardless of the target.”

I don’t expect much of people except that they treat others how they want to be treated. The Golden Rule as it’s called, but so many have forgotten it. They’re too interested in pushing their own emotions and opinions on others, and they feel personally affronted if anyone dares to disagree.

Sorry, but my emotions are my own. No one but me is responsible for them. Just because I get angry when someone disagrees with my presumptions and assumptions, it doesn’t mean I should automatically lash out for no other reason than remain comfortable in my own righteousness. Why? Because I could be wrong. Being wrong is not a sin, but not admitting when I’m wrong can be.

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